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The Best Behringer Pedals 2021 | Tone Control On A Budget

Behringer is a brand that some people turn their nose up at. Some of their older gear does not have the best reputation. Especially if you compare it to stuff that costs twice as much - or more. The fact is, that Behringer actually manufactures decent gear that is hard to compete with at its price point. They are a great option for someone that is starting to learn how to play guitar and want to experiment with other sounds. We have compiled a list of the best Behringer Pedals. So, you can pick some of their standouts to build a quality pedalboard at a fraction of the price of other brands.

A Quick Look At The Best Behringer Pedals

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Behringer Vintage Tube Monster VT999 Review

The Best Behringer Pedals

TL;DR

The most expensive overdrive pedal that Behringer offers. Plenty of controls to adapt your tone. Capable of anything from light distortion to saturated metal. This is perfect to get tube overdrive on your solid-state amplifier.

Pros
  • True Bypass
  • Versatile tones
  • Noise gate included in the pedal
Cons
  • Heavy
  • Potential for the tube to break in transport
  • The tube will need replacing eventually

This affordable pedal uses solid-state circuitry paired with a 12AX7 preamp tube. This type of tube is in a few different famous guitar amps such as a Fender deluxe. Therefore, this type of tube is great for recreating the signature tone of such amps.

With the drive turned low you can get a light fuzz. If you crank it up you can get a much heavier tone.

With the hard bypass, a noise gate, and 3 band eq there is plenty to love about the controls of the VT999. It is pretty straight forward to adapt your sound. If you are comfortable with setting up your amplifier, you won't have any trouble with this pedal.

It has a metal casing that is necessary to protect the tube. On the other hand, it makes this a pretty beefy pedal when coupled with its size. It's not ideal to have on your pedal board as it will make it very heavy and take up a lot of space. You could carry it separately from the rest of the board though, so it shouldn't be a deal-breaker. This pedal is still way lighter than carrying a tube amp head around and achieves a similar goal.

This pedal is a good choice for someone that has a solid-state amplifier and wants tube quality overdrive. Using this pedal, they can achieve this without having to fork out for a valve amplifier.

With the drive set low, you can get a bluesy tone and if you crank it up you can go full metal. The tone controls on the box mean you can tinker with the tone on the pedal and your amp. Great for metalcore or djent.

 

Similar pedals

These are a quality budget alternative to something like a Tube Screamer or MXR Distortion plus. Behringer does also make a direct copy of a Tube Screamer called a TO800. Check that out if you want to get as close to that pedal as possible on a budget.

Behringer Vintage Phaser VP1 Review

Behringer  VP1

TL;DR

A simple to use - single control pedal. This is an above decent phase unit, especially when considering the cost. As the name suggests, it's a vintage style of phasing.

Pros
  • Simple to use
  • Wide range of phase speeds
  • Minimal unwanted noise
Cons
  • Less control than some of the competition

This is a pedal for purists. You could get decent phase effects out of most multi-fx pedals, but there is something appealing about having a standalone box. The VP1 offers simple to use yet versatile vintage phasing effects for a bargain price.

There is a single knob that controls the phase rate. You can create anything from a slow tone shift to something closer to an auto-wah, depending on how high you have the phase rate.

To accompany the single knob, there is also a tone switch that controls how much color the pedal adds to your sound. If you want the pedal to only phase without adding any of its tonal characteristics you can switch the tone off. Prefer a little more flavor for your sound? Switch it on.

A common problem amongst budget phase pedals is having unwanted noise. The VP1 does its best to avoid this issue. It is not perfectly silent but no vintage phase would be. If you need something that has a deathly flat signal perhaps go for something with a more modern design.

 

Similar Pedals

This is a good match if you can't justify forking out for an MXR 1974 Vintage Phase 90.

Behringer DR600 Digital Reverb Review

Behringer DR600

TL;DR

A solid contender of the best budget-friendly reverb pedals. It doesn't quite hold up to the big boys, but considering it costs about half as much as the equivalent Boss pedal, it sounds great.

Pros
  • Simple to use
  • Wide range of phase speeds
  • Minimal unwanted noise
Cons
  • Less control than some of the competition

The circuitry inside these pedals is actually on point. You will love the reverb that this budget pedal outputs. It sounds comparable to much more expensive pedals but is lacking a little definition you could expect from a premium offering.

The outer construction of this pedal is plastic. This is obviously not as sturdy as a metal housed unit. However, I have never had any trouble with a plastic pedal. This is of course anecdotal evidence of the toughness of the pedal. If you really STOMP your stompboxes its plastic construction is something to keep in mind.

The control parameters are a point at which these pedals shine. In this regard, they are as good as their more expensive competition. You get knobs for level, type, tone, and mode. The modes span spring, plate, hall, gate, room, and modulate.

Combining each different mode of reverb with adjustments to the other settings makes for a huge range of available tones. Being able to plug in through stereo also helps with this huge tonal variety.

With the settings turned up you can get an almost tremolo effect. Especially if you are pairing this with an electric guitar.

To get a hang of this pedal you could opt to set each dial to 12 and work your way backward and forward for each setting. After doing this for a while you will find something desirable to you.

You could just as easily couple this guitar pedal with a bass guitar too.

 

Similar pedals

You could use this if you don't have the budget for a Boss DD8 delay pedal or a Keeley Aurora. It won't sound quite as good as these options but offers similar parameters to experiment with.

 

Keep in mind this is a digital reverb so it will not be able to recreate analog tones.

Behringer Ultra Metal UM300 Review

Behringer Ultra Metal UM300

TL;DR

This provides enough saturated distortion to get your humbuckers screaming. Some definition is lacking with the drive turned all the way up. If you're pushing it that hard you are probably after a wall of sound anyway.

Pros
  • Easy to use
  • 2 middle frequency controls
  • Fat aggressive tone
Cons
  • A little floppy when pushed hard
  • Plastic housing

Want a BOSS MT-2 for around 1/4 the price? Take a look at this!

If you have played metal before you would know how important mastering the mids is to creating an ideal tone. Having two separate tone controls for the upper and lower mids makes this distortion pedal perfect for isolating the right frequencies.

This pedal is great to pair with a 7 string guitar, or an 8 string. The extra crunch makes the lower notes really shine in the mix.

This can go very hard. You can create an incredibly aggressive atmosphere using this pedal. For this reason, it would not be an ideal choice to combine this with the dirty channel of your amplifier. You would likely encounter a lot of feedback if you were to take that route. You would be better of using these as a replacement for the dirty channel. This means they would be good to pair with a jazz amplifier if you wanted it to be able to get heavy.

The controls are simple to use, even for a beginner. You won't want to push the drive too hard as you will lose most of your clarity. Don't worry though, even set to 12 o'clock you will have enough distortion to cover most styles of metal.

The plastic housing is not very metal friendly, but if you take care of the pedal it shouldn't be a problem.

 

Similar Pedals

This is a direct copy of the uber-popular BOSS MT-2. There are plenty of other pedals that also try to recreate this pedal so there are literally hundreds of similar pedals. Many of these would also be budget-friendly, yet not from a reliable brand like Behringer.

Behringer Digital Multi-FX FX600 Review

Behringer Digital FX600

TL;DR

This is an option for someone to dip their toes into Behringer effects pedals. It offers similar quality to their standalone pedals all wrapped up in one package. It falls a little short of buying each pedal separately but is worth having a look at.

Pros
  • Multiple effects in one package
  • Budget-friendly
Cons
  • Only one effect active at a time
  • No display
  • No modulation pedal

Not sure what effects you want? This is the simple option to get a taste for what each effect can do for your sound from Behringer.

There is A LOT of competition out there for budget multi-effects pedals. Unfortunately, this one does not really shine above the rest. However, if you are looking to move into multiple stompboxes later this cheap pedal is perfect to gain knowledge of Behringer sounds.

Much of the competition for multi-fx boxes come equipped with a volume pedal that can control parameters for each effect. This makes them more versatile than this offering from Behringer. The inability to play more than one effect at a time is also a letdown.

The included effects in this Behringer guitar pedal are flanger, chorus, phaser, delay, and tremolo. It would be nice to use some of these effects in unison like the flanger and tremolo but it is not possible with this box.

The controls for the stompbox could be a little overwhelming for a beginner but shouldn't take too long to wrap your head around. It's actually fun to experiment with the settings for the first time.

The lack of a screen to save presets can make it a little difficult to dial back in your favorites so keep a mental note of your favorite settings.

 

Similar Pedals

Zoom is one brand that comes to mind. you could also go for a multi-fx Joyo pedal. These are similarly priced. If you don't plan to fill out your collection with other Behringer pedals in the future these could be a more sensible choice.

Behringer Graphic Equalizer EQ700 Review

Behringer EQ 700

TL;DR

An EQ pedal is great for fine-tuning the sound of your setup. This box is a great way to achieve this with a low budget. Keep in mind there is no true solid bypass on this so you should leave it active.

Pros
  • So cheap
  • Looks great
Cons
  • Plastic housing
  • No true-bypass

There is not really much to say about this product, to be honest. It is a decent EQ pedal. If you feel like you need one for your setup and don't want to spend a fortune this is a great option.

As the bypass is not true on this EQ you could get some unwanted noise from this Behringer product. If you're a guitarist that needs to skip the EQ when switching channels it may be better to buy a more expensive unit.

The controls are just what you would expect from a graphic EQ. It has 7 faders for EQ and one for level. You could use this as a boost pedal in a pinch because of this feature.

 

Similar Pedals

Literally any graphic EQ unit.

 

Behringer Super Fuzz SF300 Review

Behringer SF300

TL;DR

These are pretty decent pedals for playing a bit of dirty blues or rock music. Has plenty of controls for a beginner to mess with and learn about fuzz pedals but falls short on tone.

Pros
  • Good for a beginner
  • Simple controls
Cons
  • Not as good as more expensive fuzz pedals
  • Nothing outstanding tone-wise

If you are a beginner and have an interest in recreating some of the fuzzy tones of your favorite artists this is a great choice. It is not as versatile and as full sounding as much of the competition is, but at a fraction of the price, it is a good place to get started.

Fuzz tone is a little more difficult to wrap your head around than distortion. This is the reason this pedal made our list in spite of it not having the gusto of other Behringers. The ability to mess with a fuzz pedal in real life and figure out how to create a decent sound is well worth the low cost of this box.

With all the aforementioned in mind, this pedal is actually very decent for its price. There are a couple of other brands that offer low-cost fuzz pedals that don't hold a candle to the SF300. So, if you are low on funds this is a perfect choice.

These have 3 modes, so you can really mess around to find something you love.

 

Similar Pedals

Electro Harmonix Big Muff is an expensive equivalent of this pedal. A similarly priced option could be a TC Electronic Rusty Fuzz.

Behringer Pedals To Avoid

Now that we have listed some of our favorite Behringer pedals, there are also a couple of less viable options out there too.

Behringer Octaver - Even some expensive octave pedals only work under specific circumstances. It is not worth getting a cheap octaver. Unless you want to deal with undesirable delay and incorrect pitch shifting.

Behringer Vibrato Pedal - This isn't completely terrible but there is plenty of competition at a similar price that smokes this one. One example is the TC Electronic Tailspin

Behringer Tube Amp Modeller - Just don't. You can get the actual tube VT999 pedal and pair it with a decent solid-state and get a much better tone.

Behringer Compressors - There is not too much wrong with a Behringer compressor pedal. However, the leading brand's equivalents are not very expensive and are much better.

 

Accessories To Pair With Your Pedals

 

Power Supply

As most Behringer pedals do not come with an AC adapter you will need to buy one separately. You could just run off 9v batteries in most cases. Yet, this is unreliable in the long run. You have to make sure you always have spares at rehearsal and gigs which can turn into a pain.

 

Pedal Board

You could get any old piece of wood and strap some velcro to it. It is a pretty dodgy set up that way though. there is also the option to carry your pedals in a bag and set them up separately every time you use them. This isn't ideal either as it is time-consuming and trust me when I say tangled cords are never fun.

Behringer actually has their own PB1000 pedal case that includes power and enough space to carry at least 10 Behringer pedals. You just have to open it up, plug in your amplifier and guitar and you're ready to go.

 

What Are Behringer Pedals' Strong Points?

They are usually full-sized. Many other brands have tiny pedals on the budget end of their range. This can be handy for saving space on your board but can result in misclicks at gigs or broken housing.

Small pedals often have finicky controls that are hard to get right. This is not something you have to worry about with a Behringer pedal.

Each Behringer effects pedal has a long warranty so you can rest assured they will last, lest you get a free replacement.

Many of the pedals sound good. Plain and simple. Some of them are akin to signature pedals from other brands and do a decent job at recreating their sound.

 

What Are The Downfalls Of Behringer Pedals?

They often don't come with a power supply.

Many Behringer pedals have plastic housing. This is okay considering their low cost. It's better they spend the money on the internal circuitry and cut corners on the box itself than the other way around.

 

Final Word

Behringer pedals are among the best you can buy for budget options. Many of them are almost as good as a much more expensive corresponding pedal. They are the perfect option for a beginner guitarist and a well worth a look even for seasoned pro on a budget.

There is no reason you couldn't have a couple of Behringer pedals mixed in with your more expensive pedals. Something like the graphic EQ would feel right at home with a number of other brands' pedals.

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Hi, I'm Chris, the owner, creator, and head writer for InciteMusic.com 
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